Read Galatians 6:1-5

1. In context, “any trespass” probably refers to sinful “works of the flesh” spoken of in Gal. 5:19-21. What does “overtaken” mean?

2. Describe the responsibility of “you who are spiritual” from verse 1. How and why are you to do this?

3. We find in verse 2 one of many uses of “one another” found in the scriptures. In addition to “bearing one another’s burdens” other verses instruct us to “love one another,” “pray for one another,” “edify one another,” “prefer one another,” “be hospitable to one another.” Verse 2 tells us that this is how we fulfill the law of Christ. What is the law of Christ? (see John 13:34-35, 15:12)

4. (vs 3) Not only can we be easily deceived, but we can even deceive ourselves! What is the deception spoken of here?

What does Jeremiah 17:9 say about this?

How does 1 Corinthians 13:2 add to our understanding?

5. (vs 4-5) Where should the primary examination of works take place? Explain.

6. Further insight: There is no contradiction between Gal. 6:2 and 5, because 2 different Greek words for burden (load) are used. In Gal. 6:2 it is a word meaning a heavy burden, while in Gal. 6:5 it describes a soldier’s pack. We should help each other bear the heavy burdens of life, but there are
personal responsibilities that each man must bear for himself. “Each soldier should bear his own pack.” – Wiersbe Your thoughts?

Read Galatians 6:6-10

1. Verse 6 the word “share” is the Greek word koinōnéō. It means to come into communion or fellowship with, to become a sharer, to be made a partner. How might this be done?

2. (vs 7-8) The principle of sowing and reaping refers here to verse 6, but it has application beyond giving and supporting teachers and ministers. Explain this principle.

3. Paul’s point is that God’s people should not share in all good things with him who teaches because it is good for the teacher. They should do it because it is good for the one who is taught and shares, and the principle of reaping and sowing demonstrates this. (Guzik) Your thoughts?

4. (vs 8) Compare the differing results from sowing in the flesh and sowing in the Spirit.

5. (vs 9) Here is an interesting perspective on losing heart. “It is easy but dangerous to lose heart. In the ancient world, this phrase translated lose heart was used for the kind of fear and weariness a woman experiences during labor before delivery. It describes a time when the work is hard and painful, but also unfinished and unrewarded. It’s easy to lose heart when we feel like that, but that is exactly when we must hang on and not grow weary while doing good. (Guzik) What may cause us to lose heart?

6. What does the “therefore” in verse 10 indicate?

Read Galatians 6:11-18

1. (vs 11) It was Paul’s custom to dictate his letters to a secretary, but he often added a short portion at the end in his own handwriting. What are some reasons he would choose to do this?

2. (vs 12-13) What does Paul say about the motive of those who would compel the Galatians to be circumcised?

3. (vs 14) What does it mean that “the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world”? Consider these verses – Gal. 2:20, Gal. 5:24, 1 Jn 2:15-17.

4. According to verse 15, what avails much? What does not? See also 2 Cor. 5:17.

5. What is the “rule” spoken of in verse 16?

6. (vs 17) It could be that Paul is telling the Galatians not to cause him more trouble by buying into the doctrine of the false teachers, because he had already suffered enough. According to 2 Cor. 11:23-28, what had he suffered?

7. (vs 18) Considering the focus of this letter, why is “grace” an appropriate desire of Paul for the Galatians?

Reflection Of Our Study In Galatians

1. What are a few truths or teachings from our study that you hope to apply daily to your life? What has impacted you the most?

2. Were there ways that you saw yourself in the actions or attitudes of the Galatians? What steps will you take to become more like Jesus?

3. God has shared His truth with you through His word! Write a thank you note to the Lord.